Ian Middleton: Writer

Articles, Stories, Books, Photos and Travel

The original Robba Fountain, originally known as the Fountain of the Three Carniolan Rivers, Ljubljana, Slovenia. This was taken before it was moved to the National Gallery of Slovenia.

The Robba Fountain in Ljubljana

A unreal sight to see.

In 18th century Ljubljana, the capital city of Slovenia, the Italian sculptor Francesco Robba (1698-1757) was responsible for many of the fountains, altars and statues dotted around city and its churches. His most famous creation is the Robba Fountain, originally known as the Fountain of the Three Carniolan Rivers. Completed in 1751, the three river gods of the Sava, Krka and Ljubljanica are depicted pouring water from jugs into the fountain pool. The pool is in the shape of a three leaf clover and from it rises a 10-metre three sided obilisk.

Robba fountain was, and still is, an iconic feature of the Ljubljana old town. Sitting beside the town hall in Mestni Trg, often surrounded by students, locals or tourists filling their water bottles, you could be forgiven for marvelling at the pristine condition of a 17th century sculpture. But alas, the one you see today is not the original.

Due to years of erosion and wear, partly because of extremes of weather and also due to an earthquake, the robba fountain was eventually removed in 2006. The original underwent a huge restoration and is now in the National Gallery. A replica sits in its place beside the town hall in Mestni Trg.

I had the good fortune to visit Ljubljana in 2005 and photograph the original robba fountain while still in situ. These are the photos I took, followed by some of the replica:

The Original

The original Robba Fountain, originally known as the Fountain of the Three Carniolan Rivers, Ljubljana, Slovenia. This was taken before it was moved to the National Gallery of Slovenia. The original Robba Fountain, originally known as the Fountain of the Three Carniolan Rivers, Ljubljana, Slovenia. This was taken before it was moved to the National Gallery of Slovenia.The original Robba Fountain, originally known as the Fountain of the Three Carniolan Rivers, Ljubljana, Slovenia. This was taken before it was moved to the National Gallery of Slovenia. The original Robba Fountain, originally known as the Fountain of the Three Carniolan Rivers, Ljubljana, Slovenia. This was taken before it was moved to the National Gallery of Slovenia. The original Robba Fountain, originally known as the Fountain of the Three Carniolan Rivers, Ljubljana, Slovenia. This was taken before it was moved to the National Gallery of Slovenia.

The Replica

Backlit view of Robba Fountain, also known as the Fountain of Three Carniolan Rivers, with the sunburst from behind the tower. It sits in the old town square (Mestni Trg) in front of the town hall. Built in 1751, this famous fountain is named after its creator, the Italian Baroque sculptor Francesco Robba (1698-1757). The pool is in the shape of a three leaf clover and from it rises a three sided obilisk. The fountain is adorned with the statues of the three river Gods: Krka, Ljubljanica and Sava, also the names of three of Slovenia's main rivers. The original has been removed and placed in a museum for protection, due to its fragile nature, and has been replaced with a replica.
Backlit view of Robba Fountain, also known as the Fountain of Three Carniolan Rivers, with the sunburst from behind the tower. It sits in the old town square (Mestni Trg) in front of the town hall. Built in 1751, this famous fountain is named after its creator, the Italian Baroque sculptor Francesco Robba (1698-1757). The pool is in the shape of a three leaf clover and from it rises a three sided obilisk. The fountain is adorned with the statues of the three river Gods: Krka, Ljubljanica and Sava, also the names of three of Slovenia’s main rivers. The original has been removed and placed in a museum for protection, due to its fragile nature, and has been replaced with a replica.
Robba Fountain, also known as the Fountain of Three Carniolan Rivers.It sits in the old town square (Mestni Trg) in front of the town hall. Built in 1751, this famous fountain is named after its creator, the Italian Baroque sculptor Francesco Robba (1698-1757). The pool is in the shape of a three leaf clover and from it rises a three sided obilisk. The fountain is adorned with the statues of the three river Gods: Krka, Ljubljanica and Sava, also the names of three of Slovenia's main rivers. The original has been removed and placed in a museum for protection, due to its fragile nature, and has been replaced with a replica. In the background you can see the Cathedral of St Nicholas.
In the background you can see the Cathedral of St Nicholas.
Backlit view of Robba Fountain and Mestni Trg, also known as the Fountain of Three Carniolan Rivers, with the sunburst from behind the tower. It sits in the old town square (Mestni Trg) in front of the town hall. Built in 1751, this famous fountain is named after its creator, the Italian Baroque sculptor Francesco Robba (1698-1757). The pool is in the shape of a three leaf clover and from it rises a three sided obilisk. The fountain is adorned with the statues of the three river Gods: Krka, Ljubljanica and Sava, also the names of three of Slovenia's main rivers. The original has been removed and placed in a museum for protection, due to its fragile nature, and has been replaced with a replica.
Booking.com
READ NEXT  Brežice - Where the Mighty Rivers Converge

About Ian Middleton

Ian Middleton is a professional writer and photographer from the UK. He is the author of several books, including Mysterious World: Ireland and A Practical Guide to Photography. His photos have been published in various books and magazines such as Lonely Planet, Bradt Travel Guides, Guardian newspaper and more. He has written several articles for Landscape Photography Magazine, Total Slovenia News, and many more.... Ian has travelled around the world, and also lived and travelled for many years in Ireland. He currently divides his time between the UK and Slovenia. All articles here are copyrighted. For permission to reproduce or syndicate any of these, please contact Ian directly.